Lenten Reflections 2019: Cultivating Joy- Week 7

Lenten Wisdom:

 “O souls! Seek a refuge, like pure doves, in the shadow of the crucifix. There, mourn the Passion of your divine Spouse, and drawing from your hearts flames of love and rivers of tears, make of them a precious balm with which to anoint the wounds of your Saviour.” 

-St. Paul of the Cross

Lenten Reflection 2019: Cultivating Joy- Week 6


Lenten Wisdom:

“Let us not allow this season of grace to pass in vain! Let us ask God to help us set out on a path of true conversion. Let us leave behind our selfishness and self-absorption, and turn to Jesus’ Pasch. Let us stand beside our brothers and sisters in need, sharing our spiritual and material goods with them. In this way, by concretely welcoming Christ’s victory over sin and death into our lives, we will also radiate its transforming power to all of creation.”

-Pope Francis, October 4, 2018.

Lenten Reflection 2019: Cultivating Joy- Week 5

Lenten Wisdom:

“Lent reminds us, therefore, that Christian life is a never-ending combat in which the “weapons” of prayer, fasting and penance are used. Fighting against evil, against every form of selfishness and hate, and dying to oneself to live in God is the ascetic journey that every disciple of Jesus is called to make with humility and patience, with generosity and perseverance.”

-Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI, 2006

Lenten Reflection 2019: Cultivating Joy- Week 4

LENTEN WISDOM:

“Lord, have mercy on me! … I make no effort to conceal my wounds. You are my physician, I your patient. You are merciful; I stand in need of mercy.”

-St. Augustine

Lenten Reflection 2019: Cultivating Joy- Week 3

Lenten Wisdom:

“If the lungs of prayer and the Word of God do not nourish the breath of spiritual life, we risk suffocating in the midst of a thousand daily cares. Prayer is the breath of the soul and of life.”

-Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI

Lenten Reflection 2019: Cultivating Joy- Week 2

Lenten Wisdom:

“Fasting cleanses the soul, raises the mind, subjects one’s flesh to the spirit, renders the heart contrite and humble, scatters the clouds of concupiscence, quenches the fire of lust, kindles the true light of chastity.”

-St. Augustine

Lenten Reflections 2019: Cultivating Joy- Week 1

Lenten Wisdom:

“Patience is power. Patience is not an absence of action; rather it is ‘timing,’ it waits on the right time to act, for the right principles and in the right way.”

-Venerable Fulton J. Sheen

Cultivating Joy: 2019 Lenten Reflections

Rockaway Beach, OR


My Catholic Counselor in a recent session, asked me, “Where do you find joy?” Everywhere. . .

According to Pope Francis, “Joy is the air Christian’s breathe.” Explaining even further in his May 2018 homily, Pope Francis elaborated, ” Joy does not mean living from laugh to laugh. No, it’s not that. Joy is not entertainment. No, it’s not that. It is something else. Christian joy is peace, peace that is deeply rooted, peace in the heart, the peace that only God can give. This is Christian joy. It is not easy to foster this joy.”

But how do we cultivate this lasting joy-the Joy of Christ that breathes life into a Christian? Not fleeting happiness but lasting and unwavering joy? A Joy inspired martyrs to sing and praise God while facing brutal deaths. We practice and cultivate joy. As Pope Francis emphasises, this lasting, unwavering joy isn’t easy to foster. But practice makes progress.

This Lenten Season, I will post a series of daily reflections to inspire cultivating Christian joy which essentially stems from a greater trust and reliance in our Heavenly Father and a deeper understanding and recognition of His love for us. He created us for love. He created the earth for goodness, truth, & beauty. We need to relearn or learn to recognize the beauty that surrounds us in this life and the next. Some of the reflections came from my recent reading of Haley Stewart’s “The Grace of Enough.”

“Oh my God, fill my soul with holy joy, courage, and strength to serve you. Enkindle your love in me and then walk with me alone the next stretch of road before me. I do not see very far ahead, but when I have arrived where the horizon now closes down, a new prospect will open before me, and I shall meet it in peace.”
St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross

May God bless you & keep you this Lenten Season!

Towards the Top- Easter 2018

Verso l'alto

Holy Week and the Easter Season 2018 did not fall into my well-intended, personal plans. Instead God took me on another journey asking me to let go of the control I grasped onto over my spiritual life and the manner in which I desired to enter into Holy Week and the Easter Season. There is nothing fundamentally wrong about having a spiritual plan or goals: attending Holy Thursday Mass and Good Friday Service or fasting and abstaining in a certain way for Good Friday or even baking hot-cross buns for Holy Saturday. But what if God desires something different and potentially more challenging? Do I flounder kicking and screaming against the tide of grace or do I surrender and place myself within the current wherever I may drift? Thankfully, he granted me the grace necessary to remain calm and united with Him.

This may seem an extreme description, but let’s be honest, we tend to think we can and should control even our spiritual lives- the manner and timing in which God reaches us or invites us let alone makes any sort of demand from us. God should allow me to attend the Triduum in preparation for Easter. I’m a faithful Catholic. I say my prayers. I offer up my sacrifices. I follow the letter and spirit of the law. God should rewards me not only in a physical way (allowing me to attend Mass) but should also reward me in a spiritual manner (partaking in the sacraments.) But entering into Holy Week and the sacraments isn’t a reward for good behavior. My logic is flawed.

How did Jesus spend his Holy Week two-thousand plus years ago? He entered into Jerusalem riding on a donkey praised and exulted only to be sentence to a brutal death by these same individuals a few days later. He broke bread with his disciples and instituted the Eucharist knowing that they would betray and abandon him. He poured his heart and soul out to His heavenly Father in the Garden of Gethsemane and sweated blood all while his disciples slept. Once he was arrested, his trial involved multiple layers of Jewish and Roman involvement fueled by fear and false testimony. “The Rock” on which Christ would build his earthly Church (i.e., Peter) betrayed Him not once but three times. He experienced unimaginable and brutal mental, physical, and emotional torture all while evil taunted Him.

He drug, eventually with the assistance of Simon the Cyrenian, a monolithic cross up a hill while covered in open sores and abrasions only to be led each step closer to a tortuous death. In the midst of the ugliness, a few women and his mother, Our Lady, entered into his passion. Once nailed to the cross, where he would slowly suffocate to death by the weight of his own body, Christ still ministered to the criminals nailed beside him. One rejected him and the other embraced Him. His mother, Mary Magdalene, and the beloved apostle John stood at the foot of the cross while the other eleven apostles and many other disciples cowered in fear and abandoned him. One disciple would take his own life. His garments were gambled off. The people taunted him and his divine power and authority. In his final earthly moments, he bequeathed us His Mother as Our Own. Then he spoke, “It is finished.”

He spoke, “It is finished.” He did NOT speak, “Everything is finished. Nothing else remains.” No, his sacrificial act of love was the beginning. When God asks me to suffer in private during Holy Week, who am I to complain and question why? He asked His own beloved Son to do the same all those years before. His suffering resulted in the salvation of mankind. Am I Jesus or a savior? No. Absolutely not. But I believe in my heart that beneath my difficult Holy Week and Easter Season lies a deeper purpose and plan. A purpose and plan I may be unaware of until the day on which I am raised up and hopefully enter into the Kingdom of God.

I used the inscription by Blessed Giorgio Frassati to caption this post, because this man was a young and vivacious godly man who desire many goods in His earthly life, but died unexpectedly. An avid climber, Frassati captioned a climbing picture with the Italian phrase “Verso L’Alto” meaning “Towards the Top.” Whether God asks you to climb up the mountain or fall down the mountain and back up always strive “Towards the Top.”

How do we strive upwards? Meekness- a quiet strength. A virtue made more and more present in my life during this Lenten and Easter Season.

“Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth.” -Matthew 5:5

“Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am meek and humble of heart; and you will find rest for yourselves.”- Mathew 11:29

DIVINE MERCY NOVENA: DAY 6

Intention: Today bring to Me THE MEEK AND HUMBLE SOULS AND THE SOULS OF LITTLE CHILDREN, and immerse them in My mercy. These souls most closely resemble My Heart. They strengthened Me during My bitter agony. I saw them as earthly Angels, who will keep vigil at My altars. I pour out upon them whole torrents of grace. Only the humble soul is capable of receiving My grace. I favor humble souls with My confidence.

Novena Prayers: Most Merciful Jesus, You yourself have said, “Learn from Me for I am meek and humble of heart.” Receive into the abode of Your Most Compassionate Heart all meek and humble souls and the souls of little children. These souls send all heaven into ecstasy and they are the heavenly Father’s favorites. They are a sweet-smelling bouquet before the throne of God; God Himself takes delight in their fragrance. These souls have a permanent abode in Your Most Compassionate Heart, O Jesus, and they unceasingly sing out a hymn of love and mercy.

Eternal Father, turn Your merciful gaze upon meek souls, upon humble souls, and upon little children who are enfolded in the abode which is the Most Compassionate Heart of Jesus. These souls bear the closest resemblance to Your Son. Their fragrance rises from the earth and reaches Your very throne. Father of mercy and of all goodness, I beg You by the love You bear these souls and by the delight You take in them: Bless the whole world, that all souls together may sing out the praises of Your mercy for endless ages.

Amen.

Yes, Jesus, asked us to Love His Mother!

Mary Quote

I must mention Our Lady during the week of cultivating meekness and weeding out wrath. She provides an important and beautiful example of the profound strength of a meek heart.

Are you seeking intimacy with Christ? Who is a profound example of intimacy with Christ? Who should I turn to? Who should I model? Turn to Your Mother and the Mother of God- Our Lady.

“There is no danger of exaggerating. We an never hope to fathom this inexpressible mystery nor will we ever be able to give sufficient thanks to our Mother for bringing us into such intimacy with the Blessed Trinity.”- St. Josemaria Escriva

Mary the Mother of God became our Mother by the gift of Our Lord Jesus Christ on the Cross moments before he died. The Mother of God became the Mother of All. So do Catholics worship Mary? No, but we do venerate Our Lady by the direction of Jesus Christ.

 “Standing by the cross of Jesus were his mother and his mother’s sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary of Magdala. When Jesus saw his mother and the disciple there whom he loved, he said to his mother, “Woman, behold, your son.” Then he said to the disciple, “Behold, your mother.” And from that hour the disciple took her into his home.” -John 9:26

Not only is Our Lady a wonderful mother, but a powerful intercessor who cares for her children- you and I. The Blessed Virgin Mary points to her Son Jesus Christ. She always directs God’s children towards Christ never towards herself. This is why Catholics use the phrase “To Christ Through Mary.” The veneration (not worship-we don’t worship Mary) of Mary heightens our personal relationship with Jesus Christ because we learn to love Christ as his Mother did. A relationship with Mary, the Mother of God of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ allows us to more fully enter into relationship with Him. Entering into a loving relationship with his Mother who nurtured him, bore him and raised him provides insight into life and love- the human and the divine. God commanded us to honor our fathers and mothers including Jesus’ mother. A woman, who on the cross with his dying breaths, he gave to us as Our Mother. That is why a relationship with Mary is profound. She is the Daughter of God the Father, the Mother of God the Son, and the Souse of God the Holy Spirit! How awesome is that!

Our Lady, Mother of God, teach me to love Christ as you loved Him. Help me to love you more as to Love our Lord more deeply.  -Amen